Bonding Through Books

Bonding Through Books

The Binc book club was originally formed after a handful of Bincers started to get excited about a new book being released by Emily Chan called “Brotopia.” “Brotopia” was about our beloved tech industry and at the time was only available through pre-order. As word spread throughout the company more and more people began to show interest until there was a quite substantial little group of us forming.

People First...

People First...

Every team reflects its leader. Two years ago in 2016, I ran 43 miles over 3 days through Bryce Canyon, Zion, and The Grand Canyon at an event called Trailfest. It was an enduring and magical experience, to say the least. On the third day, during the final 18-miles through the northern crest of the Grand Canyon, I spent most of my time pacing with a close friend. We talked about many topics during those 18 miles but the one that stood out was a discussion about life’s priorities…

16 Years - 16 Recruiting Lessons Learned

16 Years - 16 Recruiting Lessons Learned

This month, Binc is celebrating our 16th anniversary. Yep, that’s right, it’s our Sweet Sixteen! Reflecting on the past sixteen years, one thing that stands out in my mind the most are the many lessons we have collectively shared. As a team we provide each other with an overflowing treasure chest full of knowledge, but that knowledge means nothing if we keep it locked up internally. So, as a present for our Sweet Sixteen, we went around the company and gathered a list of lessons learned by recruiters during their time here at Binc. After all what’s an anniversary celebration without presents?

Reinventing Our Core Values

Reinventing Our Core Values

Who are we?  What do we stand for?  Why do we do what we do?  Those are all questions we started asking ourselves as a company a little over a year ago.  We had an established set of core values; values that drove us, values that empowered us, values that were the building blocks to who we were, the foundation for all our actions, values that made up our DNA.  Teamwork, Commitment, Growth, Intelligence, Humility; the five values we related to the most, the five pillars of Binc. But, did these five words truly reflect who we were? Did they genuinely encompass that which takes dozens of unique individuals and personalities and unites them as one fluid team?  The answer was not completely.

Anxiety, Assertiveness, and Adulthood

Anxiety, Assertiveness, and Adulthood

I’m really lucky to have been able to join Binc so soon after finishing college. While I never dreamed about becoming a recruiter as a child, I can definitely see a mountain of progress from just these past three months and am extremely grateful for some of the things I’ve learned thus far. I’ve learned how to source like a machine, craft some pretty decent pitches, and control my sassiness when emailing unresponsive candidates for the third time in a row. But more importantly, I’ve learned that recruiting relies on both concessions and rejections. It is an industry that lives and dies upon communication and collaboration. This has probably been the single most rewarding and frustrating piece I’ve come to understand since joining Binc.

Strings Attached: A Beginner Recruiter

Strings Attached: A Beginner Recruiter

My journey to tech recruiting began with my undergraduate degree-- and just to make it clear, my degree has almost no relationship with tech, or with recruiting.

I had an interesting path going into college because I didn’t want to attend at all. I grew up as a triplet, so college touring was an emotional and strange family endeavor. My brother and sister were excited to go to college; I was not. I was a hormonal teenager during our entire trip up and down the California coast: headphones in, “napping,” lips pursed shut, pure protest.

Choosing Happiness: Six Months After Leaving Engineering.

Choosing Happiness: Six Months After Leaving Engineering.

For the first time in my long career, I really felt like I was being interviewed by people who I really wanted to work with and that the job was one that I really wanted to do not because of the title, money or product that the company was making but because it felt right. It also felt like this is something I would love to do, to go to work every day excited, eager to learn, and wanting to put in the hours, just like I felt the first time I hired my own team. It was then I realized that with the new job, I could work on my game designs, still teach, still code, and enjoy the work I am doing.